Romesco

Metric version of recipe

Yields 2 1/2 cups

Ingredient Amount
Dried ñora pepper (choricero) 1 ea.
Tomatoes, ripe 1 lb. 4 oz.
Garlic cloves, peeled and roasted until golden 4 ea.
Olive oil, extra virgin, divided use ½ cup
Day-old country-style bread 1 slice
Haxelnuts, roasted and skinned 2/3 cup
Sherry vinegar 2 Tbsp.
Salt ½ tsp.
Black pepper, freshly ground ¼ tsp.
Flat-leaf parsley, chopped 1 Tbsp.

Method

  1. Cut open the pepper, remove the seeds, and place it in a bowl. Cover with ½ cup of hot water and soak for 30 minutes, or until soft.
  2. Preheat the broiler. Place the tomatoes on a foil-covered baking sheet, and place under the broiler about 1 inch beneath the flame (or roast the tomatoes over coals). Broil for 2 to 3 minutes, until the skins blacken. Turn the tomatoes over and repeat on the other side. Remove from the heat and put through the fine blade of a food mill, along with the roasted garlic.
  3. Heat ¼ cup of the oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat and fry the bread until crisp, about 2 minutes per side. Be careful not to burn the bread. Remove from the heat.
  4. Scrape the pulp from the soaked ñora with a sharp knife.
  5. Turn on a food processor fitted with the steel blade and drop in the raw garlic clove. Blend until it adheres to the sides of the bowl, at 15 seconds, then stop the machine and scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the hazelnuts and fried bread with its oil, and process to a paste (this can also be done in a mortar and pestle), about 2 minutes. Add the tomatoes and ñora pulp, and turn on the machine. With the machine running, drizzle in the remaining oil and vinegar and process to a smooth paste, about 2 minutes. Season to taste with the salt, pepper, and chopped parsley. Serve immediately, or refrigerate for up to 1 week.

Additional tips

Recipe credit: Nando Jubany, as presented at the Worlds of Flavor International Conference & Festival. Published with permission of the author. All rights reserved. Presented at Kitchen Workshop I on Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006.

© 2017 The Culinary Institute of America